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Full text of "Art of tomorrow : fifth catalogue of the Solomon R. Guggenheim collection of non-objective paintings, part of which is temporarily exhibited at 24 East 54th Street, New York City, opening June 1st, 1939"

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SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM COLLECTION OF 




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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Library and Archives 



http://www.archive.org/details/artoftomorrowfif1939gugg 



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The theme center of the New York World's Fair owes its inspiration to this creation of Rudolf Bauer, 
"The Holy One," painted in 1936, exhibited and published in 1937 in the United States of America. 



ART OF TOMORROW 






RUDOLF BAUER 



FIFTH CATALOGUE OF THE SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM 
COLLECTION OF NON-OBJECTIVE PAINTINGS 
PART OF WHICH IS TEMPORARILY EXHIBITED 
AT 24 EAST 54 th STREET, NEW YORK CITY 
OPENING JUNE 1 st , 1939 



SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION 



NEW YORK 




RUDOLF BAUER, No. 103, No. 104, No. 105, No. 106, "TETRAPTYCHON" Symphony in four movements. 



THE POWER OF SPIRITUAL RHYTHM 



A great epoch in art is started by genius who has the power to improve former accom- 
plishments and the prophecy to state the new ideal. 

Genius is a special gift of God to the elite of a nation. Great art is always advanced to 
the understanding of masses. Yet masses indirectly are benefited through the fame for 
culture which the advance guard of elite brings to them in the increase of their importance 
as a nation. 

There are thousands of people interested towards creating the importance of their century. 
When addressed to them, art is certain of response. In the coming millennium masses will 
profit by the prophetic cultural achievements of these thousands as courageous, honest, 
far-seeing creators influence the style of the earth of tomorrow. 

A highly developed taste, the most refined cultural expression of art can be acquired by 
anyone who is able to feel beauty. 

The sense for beauty and art must be felt intuitively and cannot be communicated, but is 
an intensely worthwhile experience, which brings lasting enjoyment into life. Culture 
enrichens life. It is the only wealth without a burden. 




RUDOLF BAUER, No. 132, No. 133, No. 134, "TRIPTYCH" Symphony in three movements. 

4 



Non-objective masterpieces are created intuitively. They are alive with spiritual rhythm 
and organic with the cosmic order which rules the universe. Beauty is their main attraction 
and all that matters to the layman. For the connoisseur of culture, masterly Non-objective 
paintings are the height of art. As education's most consequential factor, they develop 
intuition and joy through vision. The power of their electricity influences everyone who 
lives with them. Their enjoyment only increases and never ends once they have been felt. 

Intuitive Non-objective painting has nothing to do with the intellectual conception of 
mathematical calculation. Mathematics or patterns of mechanical symmetry or intellectual 
abstractions are not art. Of this thousands can be produced. Masterpieces are so rare 
that they can hardly be found. Already twenty thousand years ago, the sun and moon 
demonstrated to cavemen the artistically perfect form of a circle, without any intention 
of being mathematical. Much later mathematical science used artistic forms to define its 
intellectual calculations, yet without any intention of creating art or beauty. 

Each Non-objective painting has its own charm, its own rhythm, its own melody. No one 
can expect to feel or enjoy them all, nor at one glance in rush and haste while pre- 
occupied. If one is not quiet, and receptive to new inventions of beauty, one cannot react 
to their influence. While contemplating colors and forms in unforeseen combinations (like 
listening to music), one may enjoy their rhythmic life, and their beautiful spacing. At least, 
one of many different paintings may appeal to some very personal taste. Seeing it more 
often will bring the joy it can put into one's soul. That is all that is wanted. The creative 
art expression of modern times is an expression of a superior mankind. Materialistic 
reproduction can no longer satisfy the need for culture in this highly advanced era. 

Millions of reproductions are produced by a hundred thousand painters every year who 
are neither creators, nor artists, nor prophets, nor builders towards a new development. 
Due to the work of Non-objective painters, new form problems first in Cubism, then in 
Abstractions, and finally in Non-objectivity have been solved. Engineers and architects used 
these form solutions due to sixty years of research by progressive painters to increase the 
efficiency of civilization. 

Earthly happenings are intellectually perceived and visually recorded. Great artists have 
proven that the eye can outgrow its primary and ordinary function, as a receiving station 
of practical information for our daily needs. 

The eyesight of many has progressed from earthly observation to cosmic vision — from a 
practical, useful, intellectual information exchange, into a medium for the intuitive capacity 
to receive spiritual joy, receptive to the influence and visual expression of cosmic power. 
When the eye develops vision, it becomes a medium of spirituality, which as a consequence 
enables leadership in good taste and reaction to the rhythm of harmony and order. Those 
in life who fail to submit to order ignore success. Order is the safeguard of life as disorder 
is the end of rhythm. Confusion is energy wasted, while simplicity of order is time 
gained. Creative order through art's educational influence brings practical gain. As it 
becomes constantly more important to order the space in which we live, acquisition of 
rhythmic balance in our daily surroundings is needed for all to the feeling of well-being 
and comfort. It must be learned early, and in schools, through the creativeness of art. 
Confused environments no longer satisfy the masses influenced by settings of modern 
architecture and furniture in motion pictures. Rhythm simplifies life and brings success by 



creating beauty. Sense for refinement is needed to enjoy the simplicity of our modern style, 
beautiful only through proper spacing and rhythm which can be learned from Non- 
objective paintings. 

It is beauty that humanity needs and wants in all actions, surroundings and relations to 
others, and beauty it is which Non-objective painting is bringing to those who can feel it. 
Yet this is not their main importance. Outstanding is their power to uplift and influence the 
onlooker and their mysterious faculty to improve those who live with them, by creating or 
strengthening in them the sense for order to acquire a rhythmic balance in life. They are 
useful and restful especially to the mind of those who are tired from daily worries and 
who through their help can forget earth. 

These Non-objective masterpieces are influential on all those who give time to their spiritu- 
ality. Like music they need loving contemplation in order to enjoy their Rhythm and Balance 
of Spacing, Motifs, Colors, and Forms. Intellectual reasoning prevents intuitive reaction to 
their beauty. The progress of humanity must be intuitively developed. Anything lacking in 
spirituality is ultimately doomed. It is spirit, cosmic order, and creation of beauty which 
originates the work of art. 

Non-objectivity and its usefulness may not yet appeal to the masses whose crave for 
sensation is common knowledge. For many it needs development to appreciate art. Children 
should subconsciously become influenced in surroundings with art to acquire loving need for 
higher standards and learn to enjoy the discipline for the upkeep of culture. Masses 
follow the leaders of culture once the new era is established. 

The sensation of the object has outlived itself, as there is not any surprise left in it, and the 
mind is tired of too much reality. Reproductive sensation of earthly happenings in the 
world is brought before our eyes daily by the abundance of photographs, colorprints, 
and motion pictures, all full of meaning and reality, but without any uplifting quality. 
One hundred years ago people had to learn to recognize objects on the flat surface of a 
photograph. Trained by surroundings overflowing with reproductions most every child to- 
day knows how to reproduce earthly objects. 

The leaders of this era of art are too far advanced to call as creative art the mere skill to 
reproduce which even the cavemen and medievals already had accomplished to more 
or less perfection. Reproduction can be artistically done and always will be a valuable 
education to train the technical skill of hands and eyes in the organic development from 
reproduction to creation. 

Accidental results, which children get who bang on the piano or fill a space with colors 
and forms without organization have no spiritual faculty to uplift. Therefore they are not 
art. Most painters trying to create Non-objective painting achieve merely dull decorations 
or simple patterns without any spiritual message. Many crazy isms like Surrealism which 
confuse the public are nothing else but a concealment of failure by those painters, who 
tired of Academism, are unable to create intuitively those unearthly masterpieces to which 
the spiritual development in art has now come. 

Fidelity to the materialistic world seems very wonderful to many who consider it the sum 
total of art and believe that almost anyone can make circles and cubes. But these basic 



forms, like the keyboard of a piano, are to be used only as mediums for creating with 
them spiritual values and for conveying the uplifting, rigorous beauty and measure of 
space, form and line. 

Non-objective painting is the culmination of spiritual power made intuitively visible. The 
forms and colors we see are secondary to their spiritual rhythm which we feel. If this 
spiritual rhythm is lacking a Non-objective painting is no masterpiece but at best a nice 
pattern if not a boring decoration. 

As long as one does not want to compose music or create paintings of free invention 
oneself, one does not require knowledge of the rhythmic order of counterpoint and 
spiritual organization with which art is created. The enjoyment in a masterpiece increases 
years after whether in music or in painting. 

Most any master of creative painting can develop an object through Academic, Impres- 
sionistic, Expressionistic, Cubistic, or Abstract reproduction and demonstrate with it the 
different isms which logically and consequently have developed the steps to the ultimate 
goal, the Non-objective creation. Here are briefly the essential isms which developed 
objectivity. 

Academism: In the academic painting objects are presented most realistically like in photography, using 
light, shadow and perspective to create a third but fake dimension. Perspective though greatly admired by 
the inexperienced layman is an easily acquired accomplishment and can be taught in one lesson to 
anyone. 

Impressionism: The impressionistic picture reflects the painter's casual impression of forms and colors or 
catches moving action of nature's happenings. While the academic painter paints one view of all he sees, 
the impressionist may combine two visual impressions. As for instance, letting a galloping horse seemingly 
fly with all four legs up in the air while actually one leg at least is on the ground. 

Expressionism: The expressionistic picture emphasizes certain lines or forms which in the artist's opinion 
increases the strength of his conception of nature and in reproducing exaggerates his choice of several 
expressive essentials of an object. 

Cubism: The cubistic picture still shades with light and dark and even uses sometimes the deception of a third 
dimension to create an objective organization with cubistic forms. 

Abstraction: The abstract picture abstracts the object to its last constructive part but discards perspective, 
while light and darkness are used as tonal qualities only, if at all, and inventive themes are already com- 
bined to play their part to enrich nature's pattern. 

All these isms derive their inspiration from an object, while the Non-objective picture stands 
by itself as an entirely free creation, conceived out of the intuitive enjoyment of space. 

This apparently advanced Non-objective painting is in reality the artistic realization of 
the present intense dynamic impetus of our time, from which great progress results. The 
most inartistic people are usually those who oppose art as it is beyond their comprehension 
and they are unable to feel its joy. All the layman has to give to the masterpiece is time to 
send its appeal into his higher self, when he may be least aware and forgets to use his eyes 
to look for earthly objects or meanings which prevent an intuitive worthwhile reaction to 
art. Non-objective paintings are priceless guides to the welfare of all who follow victori- 
ous spirituality instead of defeated materialism. The beautiful Non-objective master- 
pieces develop sense for culture and order in all those who give time to their useful, 
joyous influence. 





Considering the incredible fights which even impressionistic paintings brought 
about only seventy years ago, it is remarkable that Non-objective painting 
should be accepted, loved and attempted by so many. The materialistic 
unrest today leads many to the need for a spiritual life and mental quiet. 
Rhythmic action, spiritual uplift, exquisite joy, all this is given by Non- 
objective paintings. Intuitive wealth is the treasure of one's own company. 
Intellect is the enemy of intuition and intelligence. Intuition guides to friendly 
actions, wise concessions and powerful leadership. Intellectual comprehen- 
sion does not give intuitive intelligence, but intuition gives all comprehen- 
sions. Intuition is a donor like our spirit, intellect only a receiver like our 
bodies. Intellectually no one can grasp what is beyond the materialistic 
necessities of life. Yet intuitively we feel precisely how to react to the 
cosmic lead. 

Anything lacking in spirituality is ultimately doomed. Only fame for cultural 
achievements lasts over thousands of years while earthly deeds are soon 
forgotten. Many Thousand years ago, the great Lao Tze left only one little 
booklet unforgotten ever since at China's wall in which he denies as art 
any reproductive skill. Plato declared that art in painting must be the crea- 
tion of rhythm with absolute forms. This art has come. It took untold years 
to develop it and to find for it a visionary, courageous, powerful, maecenas, 
like Solomon R. Guggenheim, willing to proclaim in public his belief and 
joy in beauty of art not yet recognized as such by all. The collection 
represents outstanding works from one hundred years of evolution of paint- 
ing from Delacroix, Seurat, Gauguin to Delaunay, Picasso, Marc, Chagall, 
Gleizes, Leger, to come to Kandinsky and Bauer, and twenty-nine years of 
Non-objective painting. 

Also in this collection is represented the development of a genius, the 
greatest of all painters, spiritually the most advanced artist whose influence 
leads in the future. Rudolf Bauer, whose every work of Non-objectivity 
is an accomplished masterpiece and so extraordinarily organized that no 
space, no form, no point could be eliminated or changed without upsetting 
the perfect organization of his creation. Also his works as a masterly 
painter, writer, philosopher and musician proclaim to perfection, the new 
ideal of spirituality. With unselfish help to other creative Non-objective 
artists he is trying to develop with them the necessary counterpart to the 
hundreds of thousands of materialistic painters alive. His latest works are 
filled with a mysterious, powerful life which no one else has achieved ever 
before in painting. 

Who does not want to compose music or create paintings of free invention 
does not require the knowledge of rhythmic counterpoint and spiritual 
organization with which art is created. Only since people learned to hear 
even subtle variations in the apparent repetition of jazz the great fugues 
of Bach became approachable to the masses. 



8 



This today enables Bach's music to be played to full houses for an entire 
evening. While only ten years ago, his wonderful variations and tone 
motifs sounded like dull exercises to most untrained ears, and those who 
felt the beauty of Bach's fugues were considered highbrows of the first 
order. It shows how time is needed for the average to get accustomed 
to new possibilities in the enchantment of beauty's elevating influence. 
With architects, engineers and designers using motifs from Non-objective 
paintings for buildings, engines, advertisements, window-displays and so 
on, the layman is gradually getting acquainted with their beauty and the 
origin of this creative art. 

Bach and Beethoven's uniqueness in music is still outstanding after centuries. 
When composers spiritually advanced even their friends became unable 
to follow. Ears had to get accustomed to new tone formalities, to be able to 
react to their message of beauty. Not until composers of unimportance stole 
motifs from the big inventions of genius and introduced them bit by bit 
through dance music or songs was it that the work of Bach or Beethoven 
became slowly familiar to all ears and that symphonies and concertos 
of masters became acquainted to the average listeners. By then the great 
masters had died in poverty. (For the greatest work of Beethoven's genius, 
the Ninth Symphony, not even Goethe wanted to send fifty guldens to 
subsidize its publication.) There was no understanding visionary maecenas, 
who like Mr. Guggenheim realized in the lifetime of genius the far- 
reaching importance of their work and who despite controversy and 
misunderstanding subsidized and confirmed the creation of great culture for 
the benefit of his country and humanity. 

The eminence in the creation of music when Bach, Mozart and Beethoven 
lived to create their eternal works was just as great in sublimity as this 
epoch is in the creation of painting. As the fugues of Bach and sym- 
phonies of Beethoven were never equalled since in centuries this collec- 
tion's outstanding masterpieces will not be duplicated now nor in times 
to come as great epochs of art are started by genius only. 

The possibility of educating everyone to intuitive reaction, instead of intel- 
lectual calculation, may seem to be Utopia. However, extraordinary as it 
may seem, Utopias come true. One of them is the present great Solomon 
R. Guggenheim Foundation to establish the power of Non-objectivity. Its 
collection, its scholarships, its help to living artists is bringing to the public 
a height of modern culture and is not only working for the benefit of the 
United States of America but for the religious welfare of mankind. 

We live indeed in the most interesting epoch which human beings were 
ever fortunate to witness — yet we can only benefit from its importance if 
we are willing to be open-minded and realize the great advance of our 
times while it is in progress. Those people who only love the styles of past 
epochs are not giving style and importance to their own period. Afraid to 
create, they are unimportant, already forgotten while still alive. It is rhythm 





which molds the character of a special style. Distinguished by rhythm a 
perfect organization is always beautiful through its harmony. 

Non-objective paintings as companions to our daily life will spread 
spirituality, rest, pleasure, beauty, and earthly forgetfulness, but most 
important a joyful subconscious influence, to develop in us the wonderful 
faculty of intuition with which genius has created them and which to develop 
increases our real value. 

Intellectual thinking makes us fallible, intuitive feeling makes us wise. 

Top of culture is where art is. Art and culture like sun cannot be old- 
fashioned or modern. They shine as a blessing to humanity, timeless and 
eternally. 

A league for spiritual leadership of culture will be successful where a 
League of Nations for materialistic claims was bound to fail. The coming 
millennium will bring Olympics of spiritual advance to proclaim the most 
important task of humanity. 

As long as the cosmic rule of sun, stars and earth has proven the undefeated 
wisdom and order of super-earthly guidance it is fair to assume complete 
safety in siding with this victorious creator, in opposition to those who 
attack with mis-comprehension every advance in the increase through 
spirituality. Although the masses live from this creative wisdom they do not 
wish to feel it, afraid to realize that materialism is ultimately doomed to 
decay. Cosmic contact possible to humans through intuition is the only safe 
escape and happy start. 

In the dark ages of individualistic convulsions materialistic disorder pre- 
vented the joyous power of spiritual rhythm. We are entering the bright 
millennium of cooperation and spirituality with its love for order and 
rhythm. Order is the safeguard of life in the power of rhythm. 

HILLA REBAY 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 167, "SPIRITUAL PLEASURES" 




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RUDOLF BAUER, No. 155, "RED FUGUE" 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 200, "ALLEGRETTO" 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 127, "ORANGE ACCENT" 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 169, "RED TRIANGLE" 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 192, "YELLOW ACCENT" 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 103, "SCHERZO" 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 149, "INVENTION' 



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RUDOLF BAUER, No. 186, "DARK ACCENTS" 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 191, "ALLEGRO" 




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RUDOLF BAUER, No. 157, "BLUE BALLS" 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 201, "INTERMEZZO" 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 129, "RED CIRCLE" 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 184, "COUNTER FUGUE" 



RUDOLF BAUER, No. 161, "DELICACIES" 




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RUDOLF BAUER, No. 166, "DANCING BALLS" 



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VASILY KANDINSKY, No. 333, "POINTED AND ROUND" 



VASiLY KANDINSKY, No. 241, "BLACK LINES" 



VASILY KANDINSKY, No. 265, "ABOVE AND LEFT' 



VASILY KANDINSKY, No. 263, "ONE CENTER" 



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VASILY KANDINSKY, No. 264, "YELLOW SURROUNDING" 



1 RUDOLF BAUER 
Improvisation (1915) 
Oil. 35 x 45Vi 




2 RUDOLF BAUER 
Yellow Circle (1915) 
Oil. 21'/2 x 17'/ 2 




3 RUDOLF BAUER 
Fugales 9 (1916) 
Oil. 43 x 59 




4 RUDOLF BAUER 
Trombino (1915-17) 
Oil. 24 x 34 




73 



5 RUDOLF BAUER 
Composition 28 (1916-1917) 
Oil. 43 x 43 





6 RUDOLF BAUER 

Fugales 3 (1917) 

Oil. 58Vi x 43 




7 RUDOLF BAUER 

Sinfonie 14 (1917) 

Oil. 25 x 37 








8 RUDOLF BAUER 

Presto 10 (1917) 

Oil. 28'/ 2 x 41 




9 RUDOLF BAUER 

Sinfonie 20 (1917-1918) 

Oil. 39 x 49 




SEE PLATE ON PAGE 55 



10 RUDOLF BAUER 
Andante 7 (1917-1920) 

Oil. 30 x 45 

11 RUDOLF BAUER 
Sinfonie 18 (1917-1923) 

Oil. 53 x 68!/ 2 



74 



12 RUDOLF BAUER 

Presto (1917-1922) 

Oil on canvas. 59 x 7Wi 




13 RUDOLF BAUER 
Animoso (1918) 
Oil. 33 x 39 




14 RUDOLF BAUER 
Con Roso (1918) 
Oil. 29 x 41 




15 RUDOLF BAUER 
Furioso XII (1918) 
Oil. 31 x 43 




75 



16 RUDOLF BAUER 
Larghetto (1918-1920) 
Oil. 45 x 37 





17 RUDOLF BAUER 

Presto VIII (1918) 

Oil. 31 x 47 




RUDOLF BAUER 

Tempo (1918) 

Oil. 29 x 41 




19 



RUDOLF BAUER 

Rondino (1918) 

Oil. 29 x 41 




20 



RUDOLF BAUER 

Aretta (1919) 

Oil. 29 x 41 




21 



RUDOLF BAUER 

Red Form (1919) 

Oil. 24 x 33 




22 



RUDOLF BAUER 

Presto 7 (1919) 

Oil. 29 x 41 



76 



23 RUDOLF BAUER 
Presto (1919) 
Watercolor. 9x12 




24 RUDOLF BAUER 
Prestissimo (1919) 
Oil. 34 x 39 




25 RUDOLF BAUER 
Sinfonie 21 (1919) 
Oil. 47 x 59 




26 RUDOLF BAUER 
Sinfonie 23 (1919) 
Oil. 29 x 39 




27 RUDOLF BAUER 
White Cross (1919) 
Oil. 44 x SPA 




77 



28 RUDOLF BAUER 
Megabrioso (1919-1920) 
Oil. 43 x 59 





29 RUDOLF BAUER 

Bommb (1920) 

Oil. 29 x 41 





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30 RUDOLF BAUER 

Blue Theme (1920) 

Oil. 33 x 39'/2 




31 RUDOLF BAUER 

Allegro (1920) 

Watercolor and tempera. 9 x 11% 




32 RUDOLF BAUER 

Symphony (1919-1923) 

Oil. 53 x 6&A 




33 RUDOLF BAUER 

Andante (1920) 

Watercolor. 12 x 9Vi 



78 



34 RUDOLF BAUER 
Funebre (1920) 
Watercolor. lO'/i x 9'/2 




35 RUDOLF BAUER 
Green Point (1920) 
Oil. 24'/ 2 x 17'/ 2 









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36 RUDOLF BAUER 
Sinfonetta 7 (1920) 
Oil. 29 x 38 




79 



37 RUDOLF BAUER 
Improvisation 13 (1920) 
Oil. 29/2 x 21'/ 2 





38 RUDOLF BAUER 

In Grey (1920-1923) 

Oil. 31 x 39 




39 RUDOLF BAUER 

Multitudo (1920-1924) 

Oil. 29 x 41 




40 RUDOLF BAUER 

Composition 121 (1921) 

Oil. 35 x 29 




41 RUDOLF BAUER 

Allegretto (1921) 

Watercolor. 9 x 7'/2 




42 RUDOLF BAUER 

Scherzo (1921) 

Watercolor. 8 x 13 



80 



43 RUDOLF BAUER 
Heavy and Light (1921) 
Oil. 29 x 41 



44 RUDOLF BAUER 
Allegro (1921) 
Watercolor. 8x13 



45 RUDOLF BAUER 
Con Fuoco (1921) 
Oil. 35 x 49 



46 RUDOLF BAUER 
Composition (1921) 
Oil. 39 x 44'/ 2 




47 RUDOLF BAUER 
Allegretto (1921) 
Watercolor. 8x13 



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81 



48 RUDOLF BAUER 
Linien (1921) 
Oil. 39'/ 2 x 34 





49 



RUDOLF BAUER 
Largo (1921) 
Oil. 33 x 39 




50 RUDOLF BAUER 

Con Brio VIII (1921) 

Oil. 29 x 44 




51 



RUDOLF BAUER 

Gracioso (1921) 

Oil. 29 x 37 




52 RUDOLF BAUER 

Andante (1922) 

Oil. 24'/ 2 x 34!/ 2 




53 RUDOLF BAUER 

Largo (1922) 

Watercolor. 8x13 



82 



54 RUDOLF BAUER 
Allegro (1922) 
Watercolor. 17 x 11 




55 RUDOLF BAUER 
Lines (1922) 
Oil. 30'/2 x A5Vi 




56 RUDOLF BAUER 
Blue Line (1922) 
Oil. 36 x 28!/2 




83 



57 RUDOLF BAUER 
Vivace (1922) 
Oil. 33 x 39 







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58 RUDOLF BAUER 

Scherzo (1923) 

Watercolor. 19!/2 x 12 




59 RUDOLF BAUER 

Con Brio (1923) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19% x 12V8 




mmm 



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60 RUDOLF BAUER 

Andante (1923) 

Pastel. 18 3 /4 x 12'/ 2 



84 



61 RUDOLF BAUER 
Serioso (1923) 
Pastel. 12'/2x 9Vi 




62 RUDOLF BAUER 
White Point (1923) 
Oil. 29 x 41 




63 RUDOLF BAUER 
Allegretto (1923) 
Pastel. 12 x 9 




85 



64 RUDOLF BAUER 
Gebu (1923) 
Oil. 29 x 41 





65 RUDOLF BAUER 

Scherzo (1923) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 14% x 1 OVi 








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66 RUDOLF BAUER 

Gadjens (1923) 

Oil. 33/2 x 39 




67 RUDOLF BAUER 

Largo (1923) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 9V4 x 12 




68 RUDOLF BAUER 

Allegro (1923) 

Pastel. 19 5 /s x 12!/ 2 



86 





69 RUDOLF BAUER 




Scherzo (1923) 




Pastel 20 x 14% 




70 RUDOLF BAUER 




Presto (1923) 




Oil on canvas. 37 x 43'/2 




71 RUDOLF BAUER 




Elan (1923-1925) 




Oil. 29 x 41 




72 RUDOLF BAUER 




Dainty (1923) 


87 


Pastel 18 x ll 3 /s 








73 RUDOLF BAUER 

White Fugue (1923-1927) 

Oil on canvas. 52% x 76Vi 




74 RUDOLF BAUER 

Contrast (1924) 

Oil. 29 x 41 



m. 



<r 



m 



ffl 



3 



75 RUDOLF BAUER 

Cheerful (1924) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 8'/s x 12% 




76 RUDOLF BAUER 

Rondo (1923) 

Oil. 24'/ 2 x 35 




77 RUDOLF BAUER 

Rhythm (1924) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19% x 12% 



88 




78 RUDOLF BAUER 
Four Crosses (1924) 
Oil. 33 x 39 



t 



$ 



79 RUDOLF BAUER 

Power (1924) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 1 8Vs x ll 5 /s 




80 RUDOLF BAUER 
White Accent (1924) 
Oil. 30 x 46 




89 



81 RUDOLF BAUER 
Improvisation (1924) 
Watercolor. 8x13 





82 



RUDOLF BAUER 

Pizzicato (1924) 

Oil. 29 x 41 




83 RUDOLF BAUER 

Contrast (1924) 

Oil on ccnvas. 35% x 28 




84 



RUDOLF BAUER 

Furioso (1924) 

Oil. 29 x 41 




85 RUDOLF BAUER 
Lyrical Picture (1924-1925) 
Oil on canvas. 33'/2 x 39% 



90 



86 RUDOLF BAUER 
Scherzo (1925) 
Oil. 33 x 3?'/2 




87 RUDOLF BAUER 
De Capo (1925) 
Oil. 23 x 39 




88 RUDOLF BAUER 
Larghetto (1925) 
Oil. 29 x 41 




89 RUDOLF BAUER 
Concentric (1925) 
Oil. 29 x 41 




91 



90 RUDOLF BAUER 
Con Brio VII (1925) 
Oil. 24 x 33V5 





91 RUDOLF BAUER 

Allegro (1925) 

Water-color. 24 x 20 




92 RUDOLF BAUER 

Larghetto (1925) 

Watercolor, tempera and india ink. 17Vs x 12'/2 




93 RUDOLF BAUER 

Happy (1925) 

Watercolor and tempera. 17'/s x 12'/2 



92 



94 RUDOLF BAUER 
Quiet (1925) 
Oil. 29 x 41 



WW 


*Qp' 7 A 


I^^^Ck^IL. 


^o\ ^M 




^Kr rfl 



95 RUDOLF BAUER 
Lifted (1925) 
Watercolor. 18'/ 4 x Il'/j 




^/- 



96 RUDOLF BAUER 
Zzz (1925) 
Oil. 29 x 41 




93 



97 RUDOLF BAUER 

Scherzo (1925) 

Watercolor, and Chinese ink. 20 5 /s x 14% 





98 RUDOLF BAUER 

Largo (1925) 

Watercolor and tempera. 12% x 9 




99 RUDOLF BAUER 

Two Counterpoints (1926) 

Watercolor and tempera. 1 2!/2 x &Vz 



V> 




100 RUDOLF BAUER 

Presto (1926) 

Watercolor and tempera. 19% x 12% 



94 



101 RUDOLF BAUER 
Lyric-Dramatic (1926) 
Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19% x 13!A 




102 RUDOLF BAUER 
Cornerstone (1926) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19/2 x 13% 

103-106 RUDOLF BAUER 

Tetraptychon (1926-1930) 

Oil on canvas — each painting 5VA x 51% 

103 Scherzo 105 Andante 

104 Allegro 106 Allegretto 




SEE TETRAPTYCHON PLATE ON PAGE 4 



SEE PLATE 103 ON PAGE 23 



95 



107 RUDOLF BAUER 

Fugue (1926) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19% x 12% 





108 RUDOLF BAUER 

Red Square (1926) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. ]7Va x 12'/2 




109 RUDOLF BAUER 

Greenpoint (1926-1927) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. \7Va x 12Vs 




110 RUDOLF BAUER 

Contrast (1926-1930) 

Watercolor, tempera and india ink. ]7Va x 12Va 



96 



Ill RUDOLF BAUER 
Points (1927) 
Oil. 40 x 27'/2 




112 RUDOLF BAUER 
Fugue (1927) 
Oil. 50!/2 x 50'/ 2 




: 



i 



97 



113 RUDOLF BAUER 
Cosmic Pleasures (1927) 
Watercolor. 18% x ll'/s 




114 RUDOLF BAUER 

In Memory (1927) 

Warercolor and Chinese ink. 9% x 12% 




115 RUDOLF BAUER 

Colored Circles (1927) 

Watercolor, Chinese ink. 19 5 /s x 12% 




116 RUDOLF BAUCR 

Composition (1927) 

Oil. 51 x 51 




117 RUDOLF BAUER 

Fuguetta (1927) 

Watercolor, Chinese ink. 1278 x 8V2 



98 



118 RUDOLF BAUER 

Light and Heavy (1928) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. \7Va x 12/2 






n 






119 RUDOLF BAUER 
Andante (1928) 
Watercolor. 18 5 /s x 12 5 /s 



120 RUDOLF BAUER 
Allegro (1928) 
Oil. 30 x 41!/ 2 



99 



121 RUDOLF BAUER 

Fugue (1928) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17Vi x 12/2 







122 RUDOLF BAUER 

Curioso (1928) 

Watercolor, tempera, india ink and paper. 20'/2 x 14 5 /s 




123 RUDOLF BAUER 

Cheerful (1929) 

Watercolor, tempera and india ink. W y A x \2Vi 




124 RUDOLF BAUER 

Presto (1929) 

Watercolor and india ink. 1 8'/4 x ll 5 /s 



100 



125 RUDOLF BAUER 

Great Fugue (1929) 

Watercolor, tempera and india ink. 1714 x 121/2 




126 RUDOLF BAUER 
Circles (1929) 
Oil. 30 x 42 




127 RUDOLF BAUER 
Orange Accent (1929-1931) 

Oil. 511/2 X 511/2 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 17 



128 RUDOLF BAUER 
Larghetto (1930-1932) 
Oil. 51% x 5114 




129 RUDOLF BAUER 
Red Circle (1930-1932) 
Oil on canvas. 511/t x 511/4 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 35 



101 



130 RUDOLF BAUER 

Yellow and Green (1930-1932) 

Oil on canvas. 5114 x 5VA 





131 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1930-1932) 

Oil on canvas. 5VA x 5VA 



SEE TRIPTYCH PLATE ON PAGE 4 



132-134 RUDOLF BAUER 

Triptych (1930-1934) 

Oil on canvas — ecch painting 5VA x 61 




135 RUDOLF BAUER 

Delicate Scherzo (1931) 

Oil. 33 x 39 




136 RUDOLF BAUER 

Fugue (1931) 

Watercolor, tempera and india ink. 19% x 12% 



102 



137 RUDOLF BAUER 

Largo (1931) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17Vi x 1 2'/2 




138 RUDOLF BAUER 
Andante (1931) 
Watercolor. 17V4 x 12'/ 2 




103 



139 RUDOLF BAUER 

Pizzicato (1931) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17'/4 x 12V2 





140 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1931) 

Watercolor, tempera and india ink. 19% x 12% 



L«&&&$&f 




141 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1932) 

Watercolor. 13 5 /s x 18!/ 8 





SEE PLATE ON PAGE 43 



142 RUDOLF BAUER 
Composition (1932) 

Oil. 50Vi x 54'/ 2 

143 RUDOLF BAUER 
Top Point-Efficiency (1931) 

Oil. 69 x 88'/ 2 




144 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1931) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. UVb x 12'/2 



104 



145 RUDOLF BAUER 
Tryptich (1932) 
3. Allegro 
Oil. 51 x 27 




146 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1932) 

Watercolor. 15% x 19'/ 8 




105 



147 RUDOLF BAUER 
Tryptich (1932) 
1. Andante 
Oil. 51 x 23 





148 RUDOLF BAUER 

Tryptich (1932) 

2. Scherzo 

Oil. 51 x 33 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 25 AND COVER 



149 RUDOLF BAUER 

Invention (1933) 

Oil. 51 x 51 




150 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1933) 

Watercolor and india ink. 18'/2 x 17'/2 




151 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1933) 

Watercolor. 17% x 1 3'/ 2 



106 



152 RUDOLF BAUER 
Blue Center (1934) 
Oil. 471/ 2 x 33 




153 RUDOLF BAUER 
Blue Triangle (1934) 
Oil. 51 x 50 




154 RUDOLF BAUER 
Fugue Maestoso (1934) 
Oil. 37 x 51 




155 RUDOLF BAUER 
Red Fugue (1934) 
Oil. 5YA x 5VA 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 13 



156 RUDOLF BAUER 
Robu (1934) 
Oil. 29 x 41 




107 



157 RUDOLF BAUER 
Blue Balls (1934-1935) 
Oil on canvas. 50% x 50% 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 31 




158 RUDOLF BAUER 

Center Accent (1935) 

Oil. 38 x 51 







159 RUDOLF BAUER 

Balance (1935) 

Oil on canvas. 50% x 50% 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 47 



160 RUDOLF BAUER 

Colored Swinging (1935) 

Oil on canvas. 50% x 60% 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 39 



161 RUDOLF BAUER 

Delicacies (1935) 

Oil on canvas. 53'/4 x 35Vi 




162 RUDOLF BAUER 

Fuguetta (1935) 

Oil. 51 x 23 



108 



163 RUDOLF BAUER 
Fuguetto (1935) 
Oil. 31 x 58 




164 RUDOLF BAUER 
Orange Square (1935-1937) 
Oil. 51 x 45 





• 




C 





<* 


♦ 





165 RUDOLF BAUER 
Black and Yellow (1935) 
Oil on canvas. 50% x 50 3 /4 




109 



166 RUDOLF BAUER 
Dancing Balls (1935-1938) 
Oil. 51 x 51 



167 RUDOLF BAUER 
Spiritual Pleasures (1935-1938) 
Oil. 51 x 51 



168 RUDOLF BAUER 
Green Form (1936) 
Oil. 50'/2 x 67 



SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


41 




SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


11 




SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


53 



SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


19 




SEE 


FRONTISPIECE PLATE 




SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


49 




SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


51 



169 RUDOLF BAUER 

Red Triangle (1936) 

Oil. 49'/ 2 x 4VA 



170 RUDOLF BAUER 

The Holy One (1936) 

Oil. 50 x 50 



171 RUDOLF BAUER 

Points (1936) 

Oil. 49!/ 2 x 41!/ 2 



172 RUDOLF BAUER 

Three Points (1936) 

Oil. 40 x 75 




173 RUDOLF BAUER 

Scherzo (1936) 

Watercolor. 17 x 12'/2 




174 RUDOLF BAUER 

Light Circle (1936) 

Oil. 47 3 / 8 x 47% 




175 RUDOLF BAUER 

Yellow Square (1936-1938) 

Oil. 52 x 50'/2 



110 



176-179 RUDOLF BAUER 
Tetraptychon II (1936) 

176 1. 50 x 19 

177 2. 51 x 19/2 

178 3. 51 x 19'/2 

179 4. 50/ 2 x 19!/2 
Oil. 



SEE PLATES ON PAGES 8 AND 9 



180 RUDOLF BAUER 
Green Square (1937) 
Oil. 46'/ 2 x 39 



a 


r 


i r- 

1 

■ ■■■ 
■ 





181 RUDOLF BAUER 
Yellow Accents (1937) 
Oil. 55 x 31 




182 RUDOLF BAUER 
Light Fugue (1937) 
Oil. 39 x 46/2 




111 



183 RUDOLF BAUER 
Fugue (1937) 
Oil. 39 x 39 




SEE PLATE ON PAGE 37 



184 RUDOLF BAUER 

Counter Fugue (1937) 

Oil. 39!/2 x 47 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 45 



185 RUDOLF BAUER 

Squares (1937) 

Oil. 60 x 60 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 27 



186 RUDOLF BAUER 

Dark Accents (1937) 

Oil. 39 x 39 



O 





187 RUDOLF BAUER 

Yellow (1937) 

Oil. 39 x 54 




188 RUDOLF BAUER 

Red Square (1937) 

Oil. 68!/2 x 88 





.►. 




189 RUDOLF BAUER 

Purple Theme (1937) 

Oil. 51 x 51 



112 









190 RUDOLF BAUER 
White Theme (1937) 
Oil. 51 x 51 




191 RUDOLF BAUER 
Allegro (1938) 
Oil. 5V/2 x 50Yz 




192 RUDOLF BAUER 
Yellow Accent (1938) 
Watercolor. 15 x 14 




193 RUDOLF BAUER 
Black Triangle 
Oil. 36 x 28 




194 RUDOLF BAUER 
Dark Square (1938) 
Oil. 51 x 55 


113 


195 RUDOLF BAUER 
Contrast (1938) 
Oil. 31!/ 2 x 41 




SEE PLATE ON PAGE 29 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 21 







196 RUDOLF BAUER 

Red Staff (1937) 

Oil. 50 x 51 




197 RUDOLF BAUER 

Austerity (1938) 

Oil. 51 x 51 




* 




198 RUDOLF BAUER 

Pink Circle (1938) 

Oil. 51 x 61 



V 



I 



1 




I 



199 RUDOLF BAUER 

Andante (1938) 

Oil. 50 x 51 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 15 



200 RUDOLF BAUER 

Allegretto (1937-1938) 

Oil. 45 x 40 



114 



201 RUDOLF BAUER 
Intermezzo (1937-1938) 
Oil. 51 x 501/2 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 33 



202 RUDOLF BAUER 
Blue Point (1938) 
Oil. 35'/ 2 x 28 




203 RUDOLF BAUER 
Larghetto (1938) 
Oil. 3T/2 x 431/z 




A#' 



204 RUDOLF BAUER 
Rounds and Triangle (1938) 
Oil. 501/2 x 50 




• • 



115 



205 RUDOLF BAUER 
Composition Blue Balls 
Second Version 
Oil. 501/2 x 51 





206 RUDOLF BAUER 

White Caro (1938) 

Oil. 29!/ 2 x 23!/ 2 




207 RUDOLF BAUER 

Red Theme (1938) 

Oil. 37'/ 2 x 29 




208 RUDOLF BAUER 

Black Circle (1938) 

Oil. 47 x 39!/ 2 



V 




V 



"p 




209 RUDOLF BAUER 

Two Purple Balls (1938) 

Oil. 39!/ 2 x 56'/2 



116 




210 RUDOLF BAUER 
Two Themes (1938) 
Oil. 43 x 43'/2 



211 RUDOLF BAUER 
Spirituality (1938) 
Oil. 45'/2 x 31 




117 



212 RUDOLF BAUER 
Triangles (1938) 
Oil. 51 x 39'/2 





213 RUDOLF BAUER 

Composition 115 (1939) 

Oil. 51 x 45'/ 2 




214 RUDOLF BAUER 

Allegro (1938-1939) 

Oil. 49!/ 2 x 37Vi 




215 RUDOLF BAUER 

Purple Center (1939) 

Oil. 43'/ 2 x 43 




216 PENROD CENTURION 

Composition (1939) 

Watercolor. MVi x 12 



118 



217 PENROD CENTURION 
Composition (1939) 
Watercolor. 13x11 




218 PENROD CENTURION 
Composition (1939) 
Watercolor. 11x9 



219 JOSETTE COEFFIN 

No. 7 

Oil on paper. 24'/ 2 x 19 5 /s 






119 



220 JOSETTE COEFFIN 

No. 6 

Oil on paper. 25V4 x 18% 




221 ROBERT DELAUNAY 
Circular Rhythm 
Oil. 460 x 105 




222 CESAR DOMELA 

College on Grained Veneer (1935) 

19 3 /sx 13 3 /s 




223 CESAR DOMELA 

Brown Blue Construction (1937) 

19% x 19 3 / 4 



224 CESAR DOMELA 

Wood and Glass Montage (1937) 

41 x 29 3 / 4 



120 



225 CESAR DOMELA 

Blue and Black Construction (1937) 

20 x 13'/2 




226 CESAR DOMELA 
Red Line (1938) 
Construction. 14 x \5Vi 




227 CESAR DOMELA 
Copper Montage (1938) 
Construction. 24 x 12 




121 



228 JOHN FERREN 
Composition 6 (1937) 
Oil. 32 x 25'/2 





229 JOHN FERREN 

Composition No. 34 (1937) 

Plaster. 16x16 






-<] 



\ 



229a JOHN FERREN 

Composition No. 31 (1937) 

Plaster. 19'/s x 23% 




230 ALBERT GLEIZES 

"Voltige Aerienne" (1917) 

Oil on canvas. 39% x 29 3 /s 




231 ALBERT GLEIZES 

(1921) 

Oil on canvas. 35 x 27Vi 



122 



123 



232 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Composition (1924) 
Tempera. 7Vi x 5 3 A 



233 ALBERT GLEIZES 

(1927) 

Tempera. 6 x 4Vi 



234 ALBERT GLEIZES 

(1927) 

Tempera. 6V2 x 5 



235 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Religious Feeling (1929) 
Oil. 78'/2 x 60 




I' 






A 




4* 








236 ALBERT GLEIZES 

Composition (1930) 

Oil. 75 x 45 



237 JUAN 


GRIS 


Black White Tan 


(1917) 


Oil. 21 


x 12!/ 2 


238 JUAN 


GRIS 


Pink and Green 


(1917) 


Oil. 32 x 21 



124 



239 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Improvisation (1912) 

Oil. 45 x 62V2 

240 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Light Form (1912) 

Oil. 47 x 54'/ 2 

241 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Black Lines (1913) 

Oil on canvas. 50Vi x 50'/2 



SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


57 




SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


59 




SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


65 



242 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Picture with Three Spots (No. 196, 1913) 

Oil on canvas. 47 x 43 




243 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Great Fugue (1913) 
Oil. 50'/2 x 50'/2 








r 



.' * 



'\P'* 



244 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Light Picture (1913) 

Oil on canvas. 30% x 3914 



\ - . 




Wa 



125 



245 VASILY KANDINSKY 
The White Edge (1913) 
Oil on canvas. 55 x 75'/2 





246 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1917) 

Watercolor. 10 x 11 






*m. 



i . ; ^-- 



¥p$r%, 



J-.'."' 



247 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Lyrical Invention (1918) 

Tempera and Chinese ink. lO'/s x 13'/2 




248 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Light Top Heavy (No. 22, 1918) 

Watercolor. 12!/ 2 x 8 



249 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1918) 

Watercolor. 7Vi x 18 



■$SfcP*£ 




250 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1918) 

Watercolor. 9% x 13'/2 



126 



- 



251 VASILY KANDINSKY 

No. 4 (1919) 

Pen drawing. 13x9 




252 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1922) 

Watercolor. 17% x 1 6'/s 




253 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1922) 

Watercolor. 17% x 15% 








127 



254 VASILY KANDINSKY 
No. 259 (1923) 
Oil. 37Va x 36 





255 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Open Green (No. 263, 1923) 

Oil. 38'/2 x 38V2 




256 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Red in Blue (No. 100, 1923) 

Watercolor. 16x12 




257 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Emphasized Corners (No. 247, 1923) 

Oil on canvas. 50% x 50% 




258 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Tramonta (No. 61, 1923) 

Watercolor. 18 x 15V2 



128 



259 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1923) 

Watercolor and ink. 16 x 12 




260 VASILY KANDINSKY 
White Point (No. 248, 1923) 
Oil. 36 x 28 




261 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1923) 

Watercolor and Chinese ink. 14'/s x 9/4 




129 



262 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Composition 8 (No. 260, 1923) 
Oil on canvas. 54'/2 x 78'/2 




SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


69 




SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


71 




SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


67 



263 VASILY KANDINSKY 

One Center (1924) 
Oil. 5AVi x 38!/ 2 

264 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Yellow Surrounding (No. 269, 1924) 

Oil. 39 x 38 

265 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Above and Left (1925) 

Oil. 2714 x 19'/2 




266 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1924) 

Watercolor and Chinese ink. 1 3!/2 x 9Vz 




267 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Lighter (No. 272, 1924) 

Oil. 27 x 23 




268 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Beige Gray (No. 165, 1924) 

Watercolor. 13 5 /s x 9 



130 



269 VASILY KANDINSKY 
On Violet (No. 149, 1924) 
Watercolor. 13'/2 x 9 




270 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Composition (1924) 
Watercolor 



271 VASILY KANDINSKY 
No. 278 (1924) 
Oil. 21!/2 x 19 




131 



272 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Black Circle (No. 161, 1924) 
Watercolor. 18% x 13 





273 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Light Unity (No. 308, 1925) 

Oil on Cardboard. 27Vi x 19'/ 2 



274 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Stiff Pointed Round (1924) 

Watercolor. 14 x 14'/i 



275 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Black Triangle (No. 320, 1925) 

Oil. 30'/ 2 x 21 




276 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Orange Streak (1925) 

Hand Colored Lithograph. 18 x 14 



132 



277 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Green Split (No. 302, 1925) 
Oil. 27'/2 x 19'/ 2 




278 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Round (No. 368, 1926) 
Oil. 20 x 1814 




133 



279 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Extended (No. 333, 1926) 
Oil. 37 x \Th 





280 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Confirming (No. 355, 1926) 

Oil on canvas. 17% x 21 




281 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Pointed Accents (No. 342, 1926) 

Oil on canvas. 30% x 49 




282 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Sounds (No. 343, 1926) 

Oil. 23!/ 8 x 23'/s) 




283 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Some Circles (1926) 

Oil. 55'/s x 55Vs 




284 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Calm (No. 357, 1926) 

Oil. 19 5 /s x 18'/ 8 



134 



285 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Yellow Circle (No. 335, 1926) 
Oil. 27 x 19 







. 




^H^H i^Bfl 











286 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Tension in Red (1926) 
Water-color. 25!A x 20'/ 2 




287 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Delicate Joy (1927) 
Watercolor. 8 x 7Va 




135 



288 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Floating (No. 395, 1927) 

Oil on cardboard. 15% x 18% 





„'^" s - 



289 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Green Sigh (No. 207, 1927) 

Watercolor. 19 x 12'/ 2 




290 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Sign with Accompaniment (1927) 

Oil. 31 x 20'/2 




291 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Hard but Soft (No. 220, 1927) 

Watercolor. 17 x 12'/2 



136 



292 VASILY KANDINSKY 
In the Net (No. 246, 1927) 
Watercolor. 19 x 1 2V2 




293 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Mild Heart (1927) 
Oil. 19!/2 x 14'/ 2 




137 



294 VASILY KANDINSKY 
No. 225 (1927) 
Watercolor. 19 x 12!/2 



































if/ 










295 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Ink drawing. (1927) 

14 x 9% 




296 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Small Square (No. 250, 1928) 

Watercolor. 12'/ 2 x 19 




297 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Glowing Up (No. 327, 1928) 

Watercolor and Chinese ink. 18 x 19!/4 




298 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Scherzo (No. 213, 1927) 

Watercolor. 13'/2 x 9'/2 



138 



299 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Delicacy in Green (No. 295, 1928) 
Watercolor. 20'/2 x 11 



300 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Quiet (No. 417, 1928) 
Oil. 20 x 301/2 





139 



301 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Echo (No. 296, 1928) 
Watercolor. I8I/2 x 9'/2 



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302 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Topping (1928) 

Watercolor. 191/s x 12 5 /s 




303 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Red Staff (No. 121, 1928) 

Oil. 36 x 20 



304 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Ripped (No. 262, 1928) 

Oil. 19 x 12'/2 



140 



305 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Triangle (No. 162, 1928) 
Watercolor. 13 x 19 




306 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Colored Sticks (1928) 
Watercolor. 16x12 




307 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Gone (1928) 
Watercolor. 18 x 15 




141 



308 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Light and Heavy (No. 457, 1929) 
Oil. 19% x 19VS 





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309 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Decided Points (No. 463, 1929) 

Oil. 27 x 13 




310 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Dull Violet (1927) 

Watercolor. 19 x 12% 



311 VASILY KANDINSKY 

No. 456 (1929) 

Oil on cardboard. 13% x 9Va 



142 



312 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Cold Speed (No. 349, 1929) 
Watercolor. 20 x 9'/2 




313 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Oppressed (No. 471, 1929) 
Oil. 27 x 19 




143 



314 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Yellow Center (1929) 
Oil. 18 x 15 





315 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Light Blue (No. 443, 1929) 
Oil on canvas. 20% x 26Vi 




316 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Circles in Brown (No. 477, 1929) 

Oil. 19 x 19 



317 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Carrying Round (No. 346, 1929) 

Watercolor. 19x17 



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318 VASILY KANDINSKY 

For and Against (No. 461, 1929) 

Oil. 13% x 19'/ 4 





319 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Strange (1929) 

Watercolor. 13 x 13 



144 



320 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Hard Soft (No. 474, 1929) 
Oil. 27 x 18% 




321 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Heated (No. 375, 1930) 
Watercolor. lOVi x 20'/2 




322 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Hard Soft (No. 390, 1930) 
Watercolor. \9Vl x 1 6V2 




145 



323 VASILY KANDINSKY 
White Scar (No. 530, 1930) 
Oil. 27 x 19 





324 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Scherzo (1930) 

Watercolor. 8V2 x 6 



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325 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Hardly (No. 492, 1930) 

Tempera on plaster. 13 x 6Vi 




326 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Long Stripe (1930) 

Watercolor. 20 x 15'/2 



146 



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327 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Thick Heavy (No. 385, 1930) 
Watercolor. 18 x 12 



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328 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Three Arrows (1931) 
Watercolor. 18 3 / 4 x 12'/ 2 




147 



329 VASILY KANDINSKY 
No. 2 (1931) 
Watercolor. 19 x 10 





330 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Light Blue (1931) 

Watercolor. 15 x I8V2 







331 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Dreamlike (1932) 

Watercolor. 20% x ]2Vi 




332 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Green on Green (1932) 
Watercolor. 2OV2 x 12'/2 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 63 



333 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Pointed and Round (No. 293, 1935) 

Oil on cardboard. 271/2 x 19% 



148 



334 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Violet and Orange (1935) 
Oil. 35 x 46 




335 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Little Balls (No. 555, 1935) 
Watercolor. 18x9 




149 



336 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Grill (1935) 
Tempera. 20 x 12!/2 





337 VA5ILY KANDINSKY 

Voltige (No. 612, 1935) 

Oil with sand on canvas. 32 x 39 




338 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Accompanied Contrasts (No. 613, 1935) 

Oil with sand on canvas. 38Vi x 64 




339 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Two Circles (1935) 

Oil. 28'/ 2 x 35 




340 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Green Accent (No. 623, 1935) 
Oil. 32 x 39'/2 




341 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Horizontal Variations (No. 567, 1936) 

Watercolor. ll'/ 2 x 19'/4 



150 



342 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Rigid and Bent (1936) 
Oil. 45 x 64 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 61 



343 PAUL KLEE 
Inscription (1926) 
Watercolor and Chinese ink. 81/4 x 5% 



344 FERNAND LEGER 
Variations of Forms (1913) 
Oil. 17!/ 2 x 231/2 



345 FERNAND LEGER 
Variation of Form (1913) 
Oil. 38 x 49 



151 



346 FERNAND LEGER 
Fugue Composition (1918) 
Watercolor. 13 x 9!4 









347 FERNAND LEGER 

Fugue (1919) 

Watercolor. 11 x 9'/2 




348 FERNAND LEGER 

Composition (1925) 

Oil on canvas. 50Vi x 2>7Vi 



349 FERNAND LEGER 

Composition (1926) 

Watercolor. 11 x 4% 



152 



1 



350 FERNAND LEGER 
Red Triangle (1929) 
Oil. 36 x 231/2 




351 FERNAND LEGER 
Cross (1930) 
Watercolor. 13 3 / 8 x \6Vi 




352 FERNAND LEGER 
Composition (1937) 
Oil. 21 x 25 




153 



353 LADISLAUS MOHOLY-NAGY 

Paint (1927) 

Watercolor and Chinese ink. 11 x 15'/2 








354 LADISLAUS MOHOLY-NAGY 

T 1 (1926) 

Oil on bakelite. 58!/ 2 x 17 



355 LADISLAUS MOHOLY-NAGY 

Tp 3 (1930) 

Oil on bakelite. 5Va x \VA 



356 LADISLAUS MOHOLY-NAGY 

Tpl (1930) 

Oil on bakelite. 24 x 56% 



357 LADISLAUS MOHOLY-NAGY 

Tp 2 (1930) 

Oil on bakelite. 24 x 56% 



358 LADISLAUS MOHOLY-NAGY 

Construction 1280 

Watercolor. 13'/2 x 20 



154 



359 OTTO NEBEL 
Triangle (1927) 
Watercolor. 10x8 




360 OTTO NEBEL 
Opus N. 450 (1935- 
Oil. 55 x 23V2 



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155 



361 OTTO NEBEL 
Quintetto (1934) 
Tempera. 15 x 1 2!/2 





362 OTTO NEBEL 

Nobile (1936) 

Watercolor. 15 x 12'/2 




363 OTTO NEBEL 

Arietta (1936) 

Watercolor. 15 x 1 2'/2 




364 OTTO NEBEL 

Warm (1937) 

Tempera. 16 x 10 



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365 OTTO NEBEL 

Avanti (1937) 

Tempera. 13 x 19'/2 




366 OTTO NEBEL 

In Between (1937) 

Tempera. \7Va x 11/4 



156 



367 OTTO NEBEL 
Scherzando Fiorentino (1937) 
Tempera. 191/2 x 13'/2 




368 OTTO NEBEL 
Dreamlike (1937) 
Tempera. I6V2 x 10% 




157 



369 OTTO NEBEL 
Swinging (1937) 
Tempera. I6V2 x 10 





370 OTTO NEBEL 

Beginnings (1937) 

Watercolor. 12 x 8'/2 



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371 OTTO NEBEL 

Cross (1937) 

Watercolor. 12 x 5Vi 



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372 OTTO NEBEL 

Lifted (1937) 

Tempera. 15'/2 x lO'/i 



158 



373 OTTO NEBEL 
Subdued (1937) 
Tempera. 16 x ll'/i 



374 OTTO NEBEL 
Enfolded (1937) 
Watercolor. 10 x 16 



375 OTTO NEBEL 
Sonora (1937-1938) 
Tempera. 11x16 




159 



376 OTTO NEBEL 

Happy (No. 495, 1937-1938) 

Oil. 39!4 x 17 5 / 8 




377 BEN NICHOLSON 

Composition (1934) 

Synthetic board. 6Va x 10 




378 BEN NICHOLSON 

(1932) 

Oil on wood. 10 x 11 




379 PABLO PICASSO 

Composition (1918) 

Oil. 13'/ 2 x 101/2 




380 HILLA REBAY 

Composition (1915) 

Oil. 52 x 39 



160 



381 HILLA REBAY 

Improvisation (1922) 

Paperplastic with watercolor. lP/s x 8% 




382 HILLA REBAY 

Scherzo (1924) 

Paperplastic with watercolor. ll'/s x 8% 




383 HILLA REBAY 
Con Brio (1931) 
Watercolor. 9 3 /s x 8% 




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161 



384 HILLA REBAY 
Fugue (1932) 
Paperplastic. 8x5 





3 85 HILLA REBAY 

Erect (1937) 

Paperplastic. 17 x 13'/2 




386 HILLA REBAY 

Upward (1938) 

Paperplastic. 17'/2 x 13'/2 




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387 HILLA REBAY 

Floating (1939) 

Paperplastic. 1714 x 13'/2 



162 




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388 HILLA REBAY 
Distant (1939) 
Paperplastic 17% x 1 3'/ 2 



- 



389 HILLA REBAY 
Two Rings (1939) 
Paperplastic 17% x 13'/2 




163 



390 HILLA REBAY 
Gray in Gray (1939) 
Paperplastic 17% x 13!/2 





391 HILLA REBAY 

Intensity (1939) 

Paperplastic. 17% x 13'/2 



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392 HILLA REBAY 

Lyrical Invention (1939) 

Paperplastic. 17V4 x 13'/2 




393 HILLA REBAY 

Counter Fugue (1939) 

Paperplastic. 17 } A x 13'/2 



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394 W. SHWAB 

Construction 2 (1928) 

Oil. 23 x 31'/2 



164 



395 W. SHWAB 
Construction (1928) 
Oil. 19% x 35% 





396 W. SHWAB 
Construction 3 (1928) 
Oil. 23% x 36 



397 W. SHWAB 
Construction II (1928) 
Oil. 21 x 31 3 / 4 




398 KURT SCHWITTERS 

Merzbild 49A (1922) 

Oil painted construction. 16% x 




165 



399 VIEIRA DA SUVA 
Composition (1936) 
Oil. 41 x 64 






400 ROLPH SCARLETT 

Composition (1938-1939) 

Oil. 53 x 31 



401 STYRSKY 

(1927) 

Watercolor. 9Vi x 16 



402 STYRSKY 

(1927) 

Watercolor. U'/i x 13 



403 TOYEN 

(1927) 

Watercolor. lO'/i x 14 



404 GEORGES VALMIER 
Fugue (1920) 
Watercolor. 5 x 6% 166 



405 GEORGES VALMIER 
Composition (1919) 
Oil. 45 x 28 




406 GEORGES VALMIER 
Fugue (1920) 
Watercolor. 5 x 4% 




167 



407 GEORGES VALMIER 
Scherzo (1920) 
Watercolor. 5Vi x 4 





408 GEORGES VALMIER 

Improvisation (1922) 

Watercolor. 10 x 614 




409 GEORGES VALMIER 
Fugue (1923) 
Oil. 45 x 28 



410 VORDEMBERGE-GILDEWART 

Composition 96 (1935) 

Oil. 28 x 37 



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411 VORDEMBERGE-GILDEWART 

Composition 97 (1935) 

Oil. 28 x 37 



168 



412 EDWARD WADSWORTH 
Composition (1930) 
Tempera. 24% x 39% 




413 EDWARD WADSWORTH 
Composition (1930) 
Tempera. 24Vs x 34% 




414 JEAN XCERON 
Composition 242 (1937) 
Oil. 45% x 31% 




169 



415 JEAN XCERON 
Composition 226 (1937) 
Oil. 25 x 21'/4 




Artists are listed alphabetically; paintings chronologically. 

Non-objective paintings are numbered 1 to 415. 

Drawings and paintings with objective departure are numbered from 416 to 725. They 
represent typical Impressionistic, Expressionistic, Cubistic and Abstract works which led 
up to Non-objectivity. 

Titles have been translated as closely as possible. 

Non-objective paintings are frequently neither titled nor numbered by the artists. 

All Non-objective paintings have been reproduced. 

The dimensions of the paintings are given in inches — height by length. 

Biographies are listed after pictures. 

The Foundation also owns a collection of Graphics. 



170 



LIST OF REPRESENTATIVE PAINTINGS AND DRAWINGS WITH AN OBJECT INDICATING 

THE HISTORICAL PROGRESS THROUGH IMPRESSIONISM, EXPRESSIONISM, 

CUBISM, ABSTRACTION TO NON-OBJECTIVE ART 

THE FOUNDATION ALSO OWNS A COLLECTION OF GRAPHICS 
BY ARTISTS WHOSE BIOGRAPHIES ARE GIVEN 



416 RUDOLF BAUER 
Star Gazers (1911) 
Drawing. 15 x 1 2'/2 

417 RUDOLF BAUER 
Promenade (1909) 
Pastel. 20 x 13 

418 RUDOLF BAUER 
Maneuvres (1910) 
Watercolor. 13x13 

419 RUDOLF BAUER 
Commanding Officers (1910) 
Watercolor. 13x13 

420 RUDOLF BAUER 
Football (1910) 

Ink and tempera. 19 x 13 

421 RUDOLF BAUER 
Flower Offer 
Drawing. 18 x 11% 

422 RUDOLF BAUER 
Skijoring 

Drawing. 18 x 11% 

423 RUDOLF BAUER 
Tennis Player, Girl 
Drawing. 11 x 8% 

424 RUDOLF BAUER 
Tennis Player, Boy 
Drawing. 11 x 8% 

425 RUDOLF BAUER 
Interview 

Drawing. 18x12 

426 RUDOLF BAUER 
Lovers 

Drawing. 18x12 

427 RUDOLF BAUER 
Abstraction (1911) 
Drawing. 18x12 

428 RUDOLF BAUER 
Woman Seated 
Drawing. 11% x 9 

429 RUDOLF BAUER 
Simplicity (1910) 
Pencil. 14% x 10 



430 RUDOLF BAUER 
Two Figures 

Pen and ink. 12 x 5% 

431 RUDOLF BAUER 
Cubic Composition (1911) 
Pen and ink. 11% x 6% 

432 PIERRE BONNARD 
Dinner Table in Garden (1934) 
Oil. 49 x 52% 

433 DAVID BURLIUK 
Futuristic Head (1908) 
Oil. 21 x 16 

434 HEINRICH CAMPENDONK 
Saturday (1918) 
Watercolor. 1 6'/e x 18'/ 8 

435 MARC CHAGALL 
I and the Village (1911) 
Watercolor. 11% x 8% 

436 MARC CHAGALL 
Quarrel (1912) 
Watercolor. 11% x 8% 

437 MARC CHAGALL 
Menageries (1912) 
Watercolor. 12% x 6% 

438 MARC CHAGALL 

Paris through the Window (1913) 
Oil. 52% x 54 3 / 4 

439 MARC CHAGALL 
The Beggar (1914) 
Watercolor. 17 x 10% 

440 MARC CHAGALL 
The Remembrance (1914) 
Watercolor. 6% x 13/2 

441 MARC CHAGALL 
Pleasure of Life (1914) 
Oil. 34 x 22 

442 MARC CHAGALL 
The Tomb (1914) 

Etching and watercolor. 4x9 

443 MARC CHAGALL 
Birthday (1915) 

Oil. 31% x 3P/4 



171 



PAINTINGS WITH AN OBJECT 



444 MARC CHAGALL 
Night (1917) 

Oil. 6x9 

445 MARC CHAGALL 
Flying Carriage (1918) 
Watercolor. 7 x 9'/2 

446 MARC CHAGALL 
The Green Violinist (1918) 
Oil. 77 x 42'/ 2 

447 MARC CHAGALL 
The Dream (1920) 
Watercolor. 12'/ 2 x 17 

448 MARC CHAGALL 
Family Portrait (1922) 
Watercolor. 8 x 10 

449 MARC CHAGALL 
Festival (1922) 

Etching and watercolor. 10x7 

450 MARC CHAGALL 
Love Pleasure (1925) 
Drawing. 10 x 12 

451 MARC CHAGALL 
Circus (1927) 

Watercolor and ink. 12 x lOVs 

452 MARC CHAGALL 
The Pink Seat (1930) 
Oil. 28'/2 x 23 

453 MARC CHAGALL 
In the Snow (1930) 
Watercolor. 13 x 9'/2 

454 MARC CHAGALL 
Country Fete (1930-1932) 
Illustration for "The Fables of 

La Fontaine" 
Gouache. 19!4 x 24% 

455 MARC CHAGALL 
The Village Street (1931) 
Oil. 15 x 18 

456 MARC CHAGALL 
My Native House (1935) 
Oil. 45'/2 x 34!/ 2 

457 MARC CHAGALL 
The Lovers (1935-1936) 
Oil. 21/2 x 15 

458 MARC CHAGALL 
Celloplayer with Cat 
Watercolor. 15'/2 x 9/2 

459 MARC CHAGALL 
Soldier 

Oil. 25 x 18 



460 MARC CHAGALL 
Village and Violinist 
Watercolor. 13!/ 2 x 1 6V2 

461 EUGENE DELACROIX 
Blacksmith 

Drawing. 9 x 6'/2 

462 ROBERT DELAUNAY 
St. Severin (1909) 

Oil. 53 x 64 

463 ROBERT DELAUNAY 
Eiffel Tower (1910) 

Oil. 77% x 53 

464 ROBERT DELAUNAY 
The Town (1911) 

Oil. 57 x 44 

464a ROBERT DELAUNAY 
Windows (1912) 
Oil. 21/2 x 18 

465 ROBERT DELAUNAY 
Red Eiffel Tower (1920) 
Oil. 66 x 30 

466 LYONAL FEININGER 
West Deep (1932) 

Ink and watercolor. WA x 17 

467 LYONAL FEININGER 
Sardine Fisherman (1933) 
Watercolor. 11x9 

468 LYONAL FEININGER 
Composition 1 (1933) 
Watercolor. 6x11 

469 LYONAL FEININGER 
Fourmaster Schooner (1934) 
Watercolor. 24V* x 15% 

470 LYONAL FEININGER 
Ship under Sail II (1935) 
Oil. 17 x 10/2 

471 EMIL FILLA 
The Table (1922) 
Oil. 17'/ 2 X 30/2 

472 PAUL GAUGUIN 
Phantasy 

Hand colored wood cut. 8x16 

473 ALBERT GLEIZES 

Portrait of a Military Doctor (1914) 
Oil. 37 x 40 

474 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Cubist Landscape (1912) 
Oil. 14 x I6V2 



172 



PAINTINGS WITH AN OBJECT 



475 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Head in Landscape (1913) 
Etching. 6/2 x 5Va 

476 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Town and River (1913) 
Pend rawing. 7% x 6'/2 

477 ALBERT GLEIZES 
My Friend Theo (1914) 
Watercolor. \7Vi x 13'/2 

478 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Chal Post (1915) 

Oil. 39 x 29 

479 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Flags (1915) 
Gouache. 39 x 29 

480 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Musician (1915) 
Watercolor. 10x8 

481 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Musician (1915) 

Oil. 

482 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Wall Street (1915) 
Oil. 35 x 28 

483 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Spanish Dancer (1916) 
Oil. 39'/4 x 29% 

484 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Three Themes (1916) 
Tempera. 7Vb x 5Vb 

485 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Equilibrium Variations (1916) 
Oil. 37 x 47 

486 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Barcelona (1916) 
Watercolor. 17 x 22 

487 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Downtown New York (1916) 
Watercolor. 23 x 17 

488 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Terrytown (1916) 
Watercolor. 23 x 17 

489 ALBERT GLEIZES 
On Brooklyn Bridge (1917) 
Oil. 64 x 50!/2 

490 ALBERT GLEIZES 
The Clown (1914-1917) 
Oil. 46 x 38 



491 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Singer in Music Hall (1917) 
Oil. 40 x 30 

492 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Here in Port (1917) 
Oil. 60 x 47 

493 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Acrobats (1917) 

Oil. 47 x 38'/2 

494 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Abstraction of Equestrian (1916) 
Oil. 39'/ 2 x 29'/ 4 

495 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Cubistic Landscape (1917) 
Drawing with watercolor. 
10 3 / 4 x 8V2 

496 ALBERT GLEIZES 
New York City (1919) 
Oil. 39 x 29 

497 ALBERT GLEIZES 
The Dance (1920) 

Oil. 51 x 38'/ 2 

498 ALBERT GLEIZES 
At the Seaside (1922) 
Gouache, 6x5 

499 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Boulevard 
Tempera. 7Vi x 6 

500 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Pierrot (1938) 
Gouache, 12x8 

501 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Landscape with a Tower (1909) 
Oil. 12'/2 x 17 

502 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Winter Study with Church (1911) 
Oil. 17'/ 4 x 12!/ 2 

503 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Landscape (1911) 

Oil. 12'/2 x 17 

504 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Landscape 

Oil. 25V2 x 31V2 

505 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Blue Mountain 

Oil. 41 x 37'/ 2 

506 PAUL KLEE 
Lightning (1920) 
Watercolor. ll'/z x 7% 



173 



PAINTINGS WITH AN OBJECT 



507 PAUL KLEE 

Hut on Mountain (1922) 

Watercolor. 21% x 18% 



523 FERNAND LEGER 
The Factories (1918) 
Oil. 26 x 20 



508 PAUL KLEE 

Dance You Monster (1922) 

Oil. 15 3 /4 x 11% 



524 FERNAND LEGER 
The Sailor (1918) 
Oil. 17 x 21 



509 PAUL KLEE 
Tropical Culture (1923) 
Watercolor. 19x8 



525 FERNAND LEGER 
The Stove (1918) 
Oil. 23 x 19 



510 PAUL KLEE 
Fixed Lightning (1924) 
Watercolor. 19 x 13 



526 FERNAND LEGER 
Composition (1920) 
Watercolor. 7 5 /s x 8% 



511 PAUL KLEE 

Tree Culture (1924) 
Watercolor. 19 x 13 5 / 8 



527 FRANZ MARC 
Black Wolves (1913) 
Watercolor. 17 x 14 3 /s 



512 PAUL KLEE 
Comedy (1926) 
Watercolor. 12% x 18 3 / 8 



528 FRANZ MARC 
Donkeys (1913) 
Watercolor. 8% x 6'/2 



513 PAUL KLEE 

The End of the Marionette (1927) 

Watercolor and ink. 12% x 18 



529 FRANZ MARC 
Blue Horses (1914) 
Watercolor. 7% x 4% 



514 PAUL KLEE 

Full Moon over Town (1927) 

Watercolor. 9% x 11% 



530 FRANZ MARC 

Urtiere 

Watercolor. 15% x 18 



515 PAUL KLEE 
"Erinneraedchen" (1929) 
Watercolor and ink. 12 x 14% 



531 JEAN METZINGER 
The Lady (1915) 
Oil. 36 x 25 



516 PAUL KLEE 
Green Eyes (1935) 
Gouache. 19 x 14 



532 AMEDEO MODIGLIANI 
The Boy in the Blue Vest 
Oil. 36'/2 x 24% 



517 PAUL KLEE 
Cheerful (1936) 
Watercolor. 13x19 



533 AMEDEO MODIGLIANI 
The Yellow Sweater 
Oil. 25% x 36% 



518 PAUL KLEE 
Peach Harvest (1937) 
Watercolor. 19% x 1 6V2 

519 PAUL KLEE 
Go Shopping 
Watercolor. 11 x 9% 



534 AMEDEO MODIGLIANI 
Portrait of Beatrice Hastings 
Drawing. 12 x 7Va 

535 AMEDEO MODIGLIANI 
Nude (1917) 

Oil. 28% x 45 



520 PAUL KLEE 
Flower 
Gouache, 9x6 



536 PABLO PICASSO 
Fruit Bowl (1908) 
Oil. 25 3 /s x 28% 



521 FERNAND LEGER 
The Smokers (1911) 
Oil. 50 x 38% 



537 PABLO PICASSO 
Pierrot (1911) 
Oil. 50 x 34 



522 FERNAND LEGER 
The Clock (1918) 
Oil. 18% x 23% 



538 PABLO PICASSO 
Landscape Seret (1914) 
Oil. 45% x 19 3 /4 



174 



PAINTINGS WITH AN OBJECT 



539 PABLO PICASSO 
Musician (1914) 

Oil. 25 x 19'/2 

540 PABLO PICASSO 
Abstraction (1916) 
Collage. 18'/i x 24!/ 2 

541 PABLO PICASSO 
Abstraction (1918) 

Oil. 14 x 11 

542 PABLO PICASSO 
Lemon (1927) 

Oil. 7 x 5Va 

543 HILLA REBAY 
Relaxation (1924) 

Paper and watercolor. 16% x 13% 

544 HILLA REBAY 
The Tiger Cat (1933) 
Paper. 16% x 13'/ 8 

545-710 HILLA REBAY 

Objective and Non-objective originals 

711 HENRI ROUSSEAU 
The Artillerymen 

Oil. 32 x 39'/2 

711a GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 

Shop (1879) 

Colored drawing. 6 x 9Vi 

712 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
Bending Soldier (1881-1882) 
Drawing 6% x 4'/8 

713 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
Peasant Women (1882) 

Oil. 14'/2 x 18 



715 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
The Ape (1884) 

Study for "Grande Jatte" 
Pencil drawing. 7% x 6Yb 

716 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
Peasant (1884) 

Oil. 17'/2 x 21I/ 2 

717 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
Enfant Blanc (1885) 

Drawing. 11% x 9 

718 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
Le Clipper (1887) 

Drawing. 8% x ll'/i 

719 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
La Grille 

Drawing. 9Va x 1214 

720 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
The Door (1888) 

Pencil drawing. 11% X 8 

721 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
Place de la Concorde (1888) 
Drawing. 9 x 111/2 

722 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
Horse 

Oil. 12 x 15'/2 

723 GEORGES VALMIER 
Still Life (1925) 

Oil. 22 x 28 

724 GEORGES VALMIER 
Still Life (1930) 
Watercolor. 4x7 



714 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
Peasant Woman (1883) 
Oil. 15 x 18 



725 EDOUARD VUILLARD 
At la "Revue Blanche" 
Oil. I8V2 x 22'/2 



175 



BIOGRAPHIES 

BAUER, Rudolf. Born in Lindenwald, Poland, 1889. 1902, while still at Gymnasium, leading 
publishers ignoring his youth, accepted his drawings. In 1905 he studied at the Academy 
of Fine Arts in Berlin. Later, became known for his caricatures and his work in humorous 
publications. He developed through Academism, Impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, to 
Non-objective painting, of which he is the outstanding master. He exhibited his paintings 
as a member of the "Sturm" and in the Glasspalast in Berlin, 1915-1919, also in many foreign 
countries. He was called by Berlin critics in 1919, the accomplisher of Kandinsky. He became 
member of the "Krater" in 1921. In 1927 he exhibited in the Kgl. Schloss, Berlin. In 1929 
he founded the Geistreich, a private museum of Non-objective painting in Berlin, unsel- 
fishly recommending other artists to those who came to buy from him. Lectured on art in 
German universities and museums, also "Volks Buehne," Berlin. He is the author of "Die 
Kosmische Bewegung" in "Expressionismus die Kunstwende," Berlin, 1918; "Manifest der 
Malerei," Berlin, 1921; "Das Geistreich," Berlin, 1931; and "Eppur si mouve," Berlin, 1935. 
In 1937, the Musee of Jeu de Paume in the Tuileries, Paris, acquired one of his paintings. 
He lives in Berlin, showing Non-objective paintings to the public, in a private museum 
since 1929, never parting with his paintings unless their acquisition is to be useful to 
uncommercial demonstrations in furthering the ideal of Non-objectivity. Bauer is the 
creator of dramatic Non-objective painting. 

BONNARD, Pierre. Born in Fontenay-aux Roses in 1867. Began his artistic studies at 
the Academy Julian in Paris. In 1891 he made his debut at the Salon des Independents 
together with his staunch friends, Toulouse-Lautrec, Vuillard, Roussel, Denis, Maillol. 
He began his designs for stained glass windows in 1895; and in 1899 took a small post 
with the Civil Service but continued his artistic work. From 1901 on, he exhibited regularly 
in Paris with the Independents, the Impressionists. He illustrated books of Verlaine, Renard, 
Zola, Mirbeau and Gide, published by Vollard. He has been awarded prizes in 1923 
and 1936 at the Carnegie International. Exhibited at the Chicago Art institute in 1939 
and in many foreign countries. Bonnard is the poet of color play. With curiously naive 
and refined perception he imposes the change of floating harmonies, the total forget- 
fulness of conventional forms. At first the scales of neutral tones were sufficient for his 
magical renderings of Impressionism. Today his palette is flowing over with all the colors of 
the rainbow. No other French painter ever surpassed him in the lyrical audacity and 
the luminous sparkle of displaying Nature's charm. He lives in France. 

BURLIUK, David. Born in Russia in 1882. Once a member of the "Blauer Reiter," Munich, 
and exhibited in the "Sturm," Berlin. Lives in the United States. 

CAMPENDONK, Heinrich. Born in Krefeld in 1889, where he studied with Prikker. From 
1911 to 1914 he lived in Sindelsdorf. He has worked with Franz Marc and Kandinsky. He 
lived in Seeshaupt from 1916 to 1933, later taught at the Academy of Duesseldorf. He is 
at present teaching at the Ryksakademie in Amsterdam. 

CENTURION, Penrod. Born in 1905 in New York. Educated in German and Swiss colleges 
and returned to the United States in 1926. In 1934 was director of art for the experi- 
mental school, College in the Hills, Herod, Illinois. He worked on the Federal Writers' 

176 



Project of Illinois until 1937 when he became a scholar and pupil of the Solomon R. 
Guggenheim Foundation. Lives and works in Illinois. 

CHAGALL, Marc. Born in Vitebsk, Russia, 1887. Began painting in 1907 under Bakst in 
St. Petersburg, came to Paris in 1910, where he exhibited in the Salon des Independents; 
1911-1914, he lived in Berlin. In 1913 he executed a mural painting for the Jewish Theatre 
in Moscow. His first one-man show was organized by the "Sturm" in Berlin, 1914, after 
which he returned to Russia, until 1922. Founded the Beaux Arts School in Vitebsk. Chagall 
abstracts nature with the deepest feeling for spacing and magnificent color organizations. 
The poetry of his fairy tales about love, animals and peasant life is always subdued to 
the masterful creativeness of modern form problems. He only uses the objects and subjects 
of his preference to display his visionary genius. Lives in Paris since 1929. Exhibitions in 
many foreign countries: in Basle, 1931; London, 1935; New York City, 1937 and 1938. 
Among the books he has illustrated are "Dead Souls," by Gogol. Most galleries own 
his works. 

COEFFIN, Josette. Born at Rouen, France. Studied at the School of Fine Arts at Rouen at 
the age of 15. Has exhibited with the Salon des Artistes Francois, Salon des Independents, 
and at the Salon d'Automne. Lives in Paris. Is a scholar of the Solomon R. Guggenheim 
Foundation. 

DELACROIX, Eugene. Born at Charenton, Saint Maurice in 1799. Pupil of Guerin and 
influenced by Baron Gros. First exhibited at the Salon Paris in 1822. Journeyed to Algiers 
in 1830. Painted the ceilings in the Palais Bourbon in 1835 and the ceilings of the Luxem- 
bourg, 1847. Toward the end of his life executed the ceilings of Saint Sulpice approxi- 
mately 1858. Introduced complementary color research and started Impressionism. 
Died 1863. 

DELAUNAY, Robert. Born in Paris, 1882. Exhibited in the Salon des Independents in 1908 
and 1911, leading in the Cubist movement. Created the first historically outstanding 
Cubistic pictures, "St. Severin," 1909, "Eiffel Tower", 1910, and "Les Fenetres," in 1912. 
He illustrated the poems of Apollinaire and of Blaise Centrars, "Transsiberion," by 
Huidobro, and "Alio, Paris!" by Deltail (Editions des Quatre Chemins). He made huge 
decorations for the Aviation and Railroad Pavillions ordered by the French State for the 
World's Fair, 1937. He lives in Paris. 

DOMELA, Cesar. Born in Amsterdam in 1900, studied painting in Berlin in 1921, Switzerland 
1922-24, and in Paris. Since 1925, member of the "Style Group." Lived in Amsterdam in 
1926-27, and in Berlin, 1927-1933. Started constructions in metal and glass about 1930. 
He lives in Paris. 

FEININGER, Lyonal. Born in New York, 1871. Went to Germany in 1888 to study music, 
but changed to the study of painting at the Academy in Berlin. From 1895 to 1900, 
he worked together with Bauer as a cartoonist for the Lustige Blaetter, Berlin. He exhibited 
in the Glasspalast in 1904, and in 1910 at the Berlin Secession and many foreign countries. 
Taught painting at the Bauhaus in Weimar and Dessau until 1933. Had honorary one-man 
show at the Museum, Crown Prince Palace, Berlin in 1931. Except for short periods in 

177 



Paris and for teaching at Mills College in Oakland, California, he lived in Berlin and 
since 1936 in New York as painter, musician and composer. 

FERREN, John. Born in 1905 at Pendleton, Oregon. First studied Impressionism. Later 
became sculptor's apprentice. In 1930, he returned to painting. He has exhibited his work 
in Paris and American cities. Lives in Paris since 1931. 

FILLA, Emil. Born April 3, 1892 at Chropyne, Czechoslovakia. Studied at the Academy 
of Prague from 1903-1905. Travelled in France, Italy, Germany and lived in Holland from 
1914-1919. Since then has lived in Prague where he is a member of "Manes" as a painter 
of abstractions. Represented in the Gal. Moderne, Prague. 

GAUGUIN, Paul. Born in Paris in 1848. Spent his childhood in Peru. He was a seaman from 
1863-1868 and stockbroker in 1868-1883; painted in France from 1873-1886. Painted in 
Martinique in 1887, and then at Aries with von Gogh in 1888. After Aries, he went to 
Pont-Avon, Brittany. Symthetist Group 1889-1890. Developed from Impressionism to 
Expressionism and last to Abstraction. If he had not died in 1903 he would have developed 
to Non-objective painting. 

GLEIZES, Albert. Born in Paris, 1881, exhibited in Paris at the Societe Nationale des 
Beaux Arts in 1902 and 1908; at the Salon d'Automne in 1903, 1905, and 1910; at the 
Salon des Independents since 1909; and at the Salon des Tuileries since its founding. He 
took part in the first Cubistic movement in 1908 and was one of the founders of the Salon 
"Section d'Or" in 1912, as well as a member of the "Sturm," Berlin. During his journey to 
the United States, 1915-1917, he produced interesting Cubistic pictures also of New York. 
Since 1916, his paintings have been Abstractions. Some are entirely Non-objective. 
Gleizes lectures and writes. His publications include: "Du Cubism," in collaboration 
with Jean Metzinger, Paris, 1912; "Du Cubism et les moyens de le comprendre," Paris, 
1920; "La Mission creative de I'Homme dans le domaine plastique," Paris, 1922; and 
"Vers une conscience plastique," articles and lectures from 1911 to 1925, Paris, 1926. 
Illustrations: "Le Bocage amoureaux," by Allard; "La Conque miraculeuse," by Mercereau; 
and "Au pays du muftie," by Tailhade. He lives in Moly Sabata, France. 

GRIS, Juan. Born Jose Gonzales, in Madrid, 1887, studied at the School of Arts and 
Sciences in Madrid. In 1906 he came to Paris. Exhibited Cubistic paintings in 1912 at the 
Salon des Independents. From 1915 to 1920 he exhibited in Paris. He made the decora- 
tions for Diaghilev's Russian Ballet, "Les Tentations de la Bergere," "La Colombe," "Une 
Education Manquee." In 1927 he died at his studio at Boulogne-sur-Seine. 

KANDINSKY, Vasily. Born in Moscow, Russia, 1866, graduated in law and economics. He 
went to Munich in 1900 to study painting with Azbe and Stuck. From 1902 to 1903 he 
conducted an art school, then travelled until 1908 and lived again in Munich until 1912. 
His first Non-objective painting was completed in 1911. In 1912 he founded the group of 
"Blauer Reiter", also published a book with this title. His works were exhibited in the 
Berlin "Automne Salon" in 1914 and in the "Sturm," Berlin, 1913-1918. Exhibited in many 
foreign countries. 1914, he returned to Russia as teacher at the Beaux Arts School and 
director of the Museum of Pictorial Culture at Moscow, 1919. 1920, established the 

178 



Institute of Artistic Culture as professor at the University of Moscow. Founded the 
Russian Academy of Arts and Sciences. 1922, he returned to Germany to teach at the 
Bauhaus in Weimar and Dessau until 1933. His books include: "Ueber das Geistige in der 
Kunst," Munich, 1912; "Der Blaue Reiter," edited by Kandinsky and Franz Marc, Munich, 
1912; "Kandinsky, 1901-1913," Berlin, "Kleine Welten," Berlin, 1922; and "Punkt und 
Linie zur Flaeche," Munich 1926. He has exhibited in many foreign countries, and is repre- 
sented in many international galleries of art. Kandinsky is the creator of lyrical Non- 
objective painting. He lives in Paris. 

KLEE, Paul. Born in Berne, Switzerland, 1879. He studied at the Academy of Munich with 
Stuck in 1898. He travelled through Italy, lived in Berne from 1903 to 1906. His first public 
show in 1910 was unsuccessful, but later he attracted great attention in the exhibition of 
"Blauer Reiter," of which he was a member in 1912, and at the "Automne Salon," in Berlin, 
1913. He also exhibited as a member of the "Sturm." In 1919 he became teacher at the 
Bauhaus in Weimar, and later at Dessau; until 1932 he was a teacher at the Academy in 
Duesseldorf. His works are abstractions of objective inspiration represented in most galleries 
of art and exhibited in many foreign countries. 

LEGER, Fernand. Born in Argentan, France, 1881. Studied shortly architecture at the Ecole 
des Beaux Arts in 1901. He worked as an architectural draftsman and photographic 
retoucher. He then began to paint, influenced by the works of Cezanne, Rousseau, became 
prominent in the Cubist movement, and developed strong abstractions influenced by 
objects. Created only few Non-objective decorations. Exhibited in the Berlin "Automne 
Salon," in 1914, and later became known through the "Sturm," Berlin, 1914-1919. He 
designed settings for the Swedish ballets. He directed an art school in Paris. He has had 
exhibitions in many foreign countries and his work hangs in many modern galleries. In 
1937 and 1938, his paintings were exhibited in New York City. He lives in Paris. 

MARC, Franz. Born in Ried, upper Bavaria, 1880. Studied at the Munich Academy from 
1900 to 1903. In 1902 he travelled in Italy and in 1903 he went to Paris for six months. 
He lived in Munich from 1904 to 1905. In 1906 he visited Greece, and returned to Paris 
and Berlin in 1907. From 1907 to 1914 he lived in Sindelsdorf, Bavaria. As a magnificent 
painter of animal life he was the first in Germany to develop from Academism to Cubism, 
which he organically interwove with nature's lights, shadows, and color displays in his 
priceless abstractions. The sweet innocence of expressions in Chagall's animal paintings 
he equalled and organized into new form problems and perfected renderings of nature's 
protective surroundings to animals' intimacy. His most important work is "Tierschiksale" 
damaged by fire in 1918. He was a member of the "Blauer Reiter" group. He was killed 
at Verdun, March 4, 1916. 

METZINGER, Jean. Born at Nantes, June 24, 1883. He became prominent in the Cubist 
movement; he exhibited at the Salon des Independents in 1903 and at the Salon d'Automne, 
Paris, since 1906. In collaboration with Albert Gleizes, he has written "Du Cubism," Paris, 
1912. At present he lives in Paris. 

MODIGLIANI, Amedeo. Born in Leghorn, Italy, 1884. After studying the old masters in 
Naples, Florence and Venice, he arrived in Paris in 1905. His works as painter and 

179 



sculptor were exhibited at the Salon des Independents in 1908-1910, and at the Salon 
d'Automne, Paris, 1919-1920. He was influenced by the Italian primitives and African 
sculpture. Many of his Expressionistic portraits were those of his friends. His life in Paris 
was one of poverty, illness and disillusionment. He died of consumption at the age of 
thirty-five in Paris during 1920. 

MOHOLY-NAGY, Ladislaus. Born in Hungary, 1895. From legal studies he turned to 
photographic and applied art and painting in 1915. For a while he taught at the Bauhaus 
at Dessau, a school mostly for handicrafts and applied design, housed in hideous modern 
buildings. So many of its staff and pupils for some time were corrupted by communistic 
political propaganda that this organization did tremendous harm to the belief in its use- 
fulness and with it to all new form problems in Germany. In 1929, he went to Berlin where 
he worked in films, stage settings, photography, writing and painting. His work has been 
exhibited in foreign countries. His writings include "Malerei, Fotographie, Film," Munich, 
1925; "The New Vision," New York, 1933; and "Sonderausgabe der Zeitschrift Telehor," 
1933-1935. He lived in London and since 1937 in Chicago. 

NEBEL, Otto. Born in Berlin, Germany, 1892. Painter and writer. He studied architecture 
from 1913 to 1918. Started Non-objective painting in 1917. He became a member of the 
"Sturm" in 1919, and in 1920 the "Krater" in Berlin. He lives in Berne, Switzerland. 

NICHOLSON, Ben. Born in Denham, England, 1894. From 1925 to 1936 he was a member 
of "7 and 5," in London, and from 1933 a member of "Unit One," and in 1934, a member 
of "Abstraction-Creation," Paris. He lives in London. 

PICASSO, Pablo. Born in Malaga, Spain, 1881. Began to paint early in Le Ceruna as the 
pupil of his father. He later studied in the Academy of Barcelona, from where he visited 
Paris in 1900. He has lived in Paris since 1903. His first studies of space problems were 
made in 1907 and his first Cubistic landscapes were painted in 1908. He has rarely 
achieved Non-objectivity. In spite of being a very talented painter he is constantly sub- 
jected to the hunt for journalistic sensations and inspirations from others, therefore lacking 
the intuitive organic development and constantly increasing volume which characterizes 
the evolution of genius. Like most famous painters he exhibited in all countries. Boosted by 
dealers and publicity, the future possibilities of his fame are doubtful and tragic. He lives 
in Paris. 

REBAY, von Ehrenwiesen, Hilla. Born in Strasburg, Alsace. She studied with Zinkeisen, at 
Duesseldorf, at the Paris Academy and with Groeber in Munich. Her paintings were 
exhibited at the Wallraf Museum in Cologne in 1914, at the Secession in Munich, 
1914-1915; at the Salon des Independents in Paris in 1914; at the Freie Secession 
in Berlin, 1915; and at the "Sturm" in 1917. She was a member of the "November Gruppe," 
in 1918, and in 1920 a member of the "Krater." Exhibited in many foreign countries and 
at the Salon des Tuileries and Salon dAutomne, Paris, 1932-1938. Her work developed 
since 1914 from Academism through Impressionism, Expressionism, and Cubism to Non- 
objective painting. Like Klee her work is mostly lyrical chamber music. Since 1937, Curator 
of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. She lives in Greens Farms, Connecticut, and 
Paris. 

180 



ROUSSEAU, Henri. Born in Laval, Mayenne in 1844. Military musician in Mexico from 
1862-1867. Sargeant in the Franco-Prussian War in 1870. Customs officer in Paris, 1885. 
Started to paint in 1885. First jungle painting in 1904. His primitive paintings are remark- 
ably deep in feelings. With the intuitive intensity with which he was able to absorb the 
beauty of a few leaves he recreated the poetry of a virgin forest. Never handicapped 
by academic banalities of reproductive tricks he was master in the feeling of nature and 
its primitive abstraction, although he never knew how to paint. His spacing was perfec- 
tion. Died in Paris in 1910. 

SCARLETT, Rolph. Born in Guelph, Ontario, 1891. Has exhibited in Toledo, Ohio, 1926; 
Los Angeles, 1930; Pasadena, 1931. Has been designing sets for the Pasadena Playhouse 
from 1930-1931. From 1931 to 1934, has been designing for various Hollywood film 
studios. Pupil of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Lives in Long Island. 

SCH WITTERS, Kurt. Born in Hanover, June 20, 1887, where he still lives. Poet and painter, 
Non-objective and Academic. In 1919-1922 while he lived in Berlin he used to give con- 
stant surprises to his friends whom he visited unexpectedly at all hours, often loaded with 
junk collected at dumping places some of which he used in his collages with surprising 
effects. 

SEURAT, Georges-Pierre. Born in Paris, 1859. He studied at the Ecole des Beaux Arts from 
1875 to 1880. He painted in Paris from 1880 until his death. An indefatigable worker, 
he sold only one painting during his lifetime. Not until years after his death was his 
remarkable work appreciated. Seurat was the first Cubist and his priceless works are 
much stronger in every detail of space perfection than any of Cezanne. Seurat developed 
from Impressionism to Expressionism and finally Cubism. If he had lived as long as Cezanne, 
he would have become a great creator of Non-objective painting, as his work already 
indicated perfected control of balance and rhythm and immaterialistic spirituality, al- 
though he died at the age of thirty-one. 

SHWAB, W. Great master of Non-objective painting. Lives in Paris and Switzerland where 
he was born. 

DA SILVA, Vieira. Born in Lisbon, studied and lives in Paris. 

STYRSKY. Born in Italy and lives in Paris. 

TOYEN. Born in Italy and lives in Paris. 

VALMIER, Georges. Born 1885 in Angouleme. He studied at the Paris Academy in 1905; 
later he worked alone in Paris until 1914; served in the World War until 1919; exhibited 
in Paris in 1921. He created state settings for futuristic plays by Marinetti, also for Romain, 
and Pillement in Paris, and for Bohn's Ballet Russe in Chicago. A fine musician he made his 
living as a church singer. He died in Paris, March 25, 1937. His latest works were three 
big Cubistic decorations ordered by the French State for the railroad exhibit in the 
World's Fair, Paris, 1937. 

VORDEMBERGE-GILDEWART, F. Born 1899, Osnabrueck, Germany. He studied technics, 
architecture, and sculpture in Hanover; in 1919 he joined the Dadist group in its intention 

181 



to confuse the public's unmovable viewpoint on art so as to open their minds and enable 
them to new visions. He created Non-objective films in 1920; exhibited paintings and works 
of absolute forms in metal and glass at the "Sturm" from 1923 to 1924; 1936 he moved to 
Berlin. He was a member of the "Sturm" in 1923, "Style" in 1924, later of Abstraction- 
Creation in Paris. In 1931 he was the German representative to the "Congres preparatoire 
du musee contemporain" in La Sarraz, Switzerland. He has been living in Sv/itzerland and 
Holland since 1937. 

VUILLARD, Edouard. Born 1868 in Cuiseaux. Studied at the Academy Julian in Paris. In 
1889, he was a member of a group called "Nabis." He studied at the Ecole des Beaux 
Arts under Fleury and Bouguereau. From 1891 and onward, he has exhibited at the Salon 
des Independents. Vuillard achieved a reputation for his lithographs, many of which were 
for Vollard's publications. January, 1939, his work was exhibited at the Chicago Art 
Institute. As France's second foremost Impressionist, often together with Bonnard, he 
exhibited in many foreign countries. He lives in France. 

WADSWORTH, Edward. Born in Cheakheaton, England, 1889. When Cubism appeared in 
England in 1910 he was prepared to understand and appreciate it. He made his debut in the 
Vorticist movement started by Wyndham Lewis, the first to import Cubism into England. His 
first one-man show was at the Leicester Galleries in 1919. He is a member of "Unit One," a 
group of eleven English artists with mutual sympathies. He lives in England. 

XCERON, Jean. Born in 1890 in Greece. Came to the United States in 1904; studied at the 
Corcoran School of Art in Washington, D. C, from 1910 to 1916, and then painted in New 
York. He has lived and worked in Paris and New York since 1935. 



182 



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